RESOURCES ON LAW & LINGUISTICS
www.clarkcunningham.org/Law-Linguistics.html

Cases using or discussing corpus-based linguistic analysis

Law review articles using or discussing corpus-based linguistic analysis

Briefs using or discussing corpus-based linguistic analysis

Websites for using corpus-based linguistic analysis

Media coverage on applying linguistics to legal analysis

Presentations using or discussing corpus-based linguistic analysis of legal texts

Clark D. Cunningham & Ute Römer, What counted as a misdemeanor in founding era American English? A corpus approach to uncovering the original public meaning of “misdemeanors” in the impeachment clause (CL 2021 Online Conference July 2021) Download ppt

Clark D. Cunningham, Non-Partisan Originalism (American Constitutional Society - Constitutional Law Scholars Forum March 2019)


Revisiting a classic problem in statutory interpretation: Is a minister a laborer?-- Presentation (ppt) (pdf)
Professor Tammy Gales, Comparative Literature, Languages, and Linguistics, Hofstra University
Professor Lawrence Solan, Director - Center for the Study of Law, Language and Cognition, Brooklyn Law
Published as Tammy Gales & Lawrence Solan, Revisiting a Classic Problem in Statutory Interpretation: Is a Minister a Laborer?, 36 Georgia State L. Rev 491 (2020), available at https://readingroom.law.gsu.edu/gsulr/vol36/iss5/7/

“Questions Involving National Peace and Harmony” or “Injured Plaintiff Litigation”? The Original Meaning of “Cases” in Article III of the Constitution” -- Presentation (ppt) (pdf)
Published as Haoshan Ren, Margaret Wood, Clark D. Cunningham, Noor Abbady, Ute Römer, Heather Kuhn & Jesse Egbert, “Questions Involving National Peace and Harmony” or “Injured Plaintiff Litigation”? The Original Meaning of “Cases” in Article III of the Constitution, 36 Georgia State L. Rev 491 (2020), available at https://readingroom.law.gsu.edu/gsulr/vol36/iss5/8/
Professor Noor Abbady, English as a Second Language, Savannah College of Art & Design
Heather Kuhn, Data Privacy and Security Consultant, Cox Communications*
Haoshan Ren, Applied Linguistics (PhD student), Georgia State University
Professor Ute Römer, Applied Linguistics, Georgia State University
Margaret Wood, Applied Linguistics (PhD student), Northern Arizona University
Comment: Professor Susan Navarro Smelcer, Georgia State University College of Law
-- Smelcer Presentation (also incorporated into main presentation)

Effective But Limited: A Corpus Linguistic Analysis of the Original Public Meaning of Executive Power-- Presentation (ppt) (pdf)
Published as Eleanor Miller & Heather Obelgoner, Effective But Limited: A Corpus Linguistic Analysis of the Original Public Meaning of Executive Power, 36 Georgia State L. Rev 607 (2020), available at https://readingroom.law.gsu.edu/gsulr/vol36/iss5/9/
Eleanor Miller, Attorney, United States Department of the Treasury
Heather Obelgoner, Law Clerk (Supreme Court of Georgia)
Comment: Edward Finegan, Professor of Linguistics and Law, Emeritus, University of Southern California -- Finegan Presentation
Comment: Professor Julian Davis Mortenson, University of Michigan Law School -- Mortenson Presentation (ppt) (pdf)

“We the Citizens?”: A Corpus Linguistic Inquiry into the Use of “People” and “Citizens” in the Founding Era -- Presentation (ppt) (pdf)
Professor Diana Coetzee, Professor of English, ON Language at Brenau University
Professor Ute Römer, Applied Linguistics, Georgia State University
Abigail Stout (J.D. '19)
Published as Abigail Stout, Diana Coetzee, Ute Römer, We the Citizens?”: A Corpus Linguistic Inquiry into the Use of “People” and “Citizens” in the Founding Era, 36 Georgia State L. Rev 665 (2020), available at https://readingroom.law.gsu.edu/gsulr/vol36/iss5/10/

Best practices for using corpus linguistics to interpret legal texts & Case Study: original meaning of “emolument” in the US Constitution -- Presentation (ppt) (pdf)
Published as Clark D. Cunningham & Jesse Egbert, Using Empirical Data to Investigate the Original Meaning of “Emolument” in the Constitution , 36 Georgia State L. Rev 465 (2020), available at https://readingroom.law.gsu.edu/gsulr/vol36/iss5/6/
Professor Clark D. Cunningham, Georgia State University College of Law
Jesse Egbert, Applied Linguistics, Northern Arizona University
Comment: Professor Eric Friginal, Applied Linguistics, Georgia State University -- Friginal Presentation (ppt)(pdf)

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